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MISS AMERICA ... THEN AND NOW

When I was a little boy, my family and I never missed the annual broadcast of the Miss America Pageant. On a Saturday night in September, we would gather on our living room couch in front of our Sylvania small screen TV that looked like a washing machine with rabbit ears antenna on the top.  We would even attach aluminum foil to the tips of the rabbit ears so that we could get better reception. 

And then Bert Parks would appear on our TV screen in glorious black and white live from the Atlantic City Convention Hall.

SEERSUCKER SEASON ARRIVES … FOR EVERYBODY!

This is Memorial Day Weekend, and it will mark the official beginning of seersucker season for everyone … even Yankees! 

As all well-dressed Americans know, seersucker is the classic puckered cotton fabric that for over a century has been the mainstay—or rather the main-dress—for elegant ladies and gentlemen.

OUR ROYAL OBSESSION

In 1776, we Americans declared our independence from King George III of England.  The upstart former colonists won the American Revolutionary War against King George and his Redcoats, and in 1787 we created the United States of America. Many Americans at that time sought a new King George for our new country, specifically urging General George Washington to wear the first American crown.  General Washington, of course, could not tell a lie, and told his fellow new Americans that the United States of America should be a republic, not a monarchy.  So rather than becoming King George, he became our first president.

THE DIRT ON MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Major league baseball is a dirty business … particularly in the infield. 

The 2018 season of the national past-time begins in ballparks across America this weekend, and in preparation for the game, grounds keepers will be getting down in the dirt. Literally.

REMEMBERING ROGER BANNISTER

On the morning of March 6, 1954, a young medical student in London completed his rounds at St. Mary’s Hospital.  He then embarked on a 57 mile journey.  The first 56 miles were taken by train from London to Oxford.  The last mile was taken by foot on a cinder track off Iffley Road in Oxford.

It was this final mile that would make history.